The 10 dumb myths of solar installers

Solar power frequently asked questions and myths

As mentioned in a previous article, I’ve been arranging the installation of a number of solar systems lately. And I like to do them big (the efficient option); I like to get them for the lowest price (within reason, because I want a good job with reasonable quality components); and I like to make sure the economics are understood and that customers are maximising self-consumption while recognising economic value for their exports.

And most importantly to me, I really want the environmental outcomes that come with installing as much solar as possible, displacing both fossil gas burnt on-site and coal and gas-fired power generation from the grid.

In pursuing those aims, I’ve run up against a few myths I get from solar installers that, frankly, have me flummoxed.

I want to buy a product off them. I’ve worked out the solution and then I’m told, ‘no you can’t’.

But in almost every instance –  with much hard work – I’ve managed to convince them it’s just not true, got the system I wanted installed and, ultimately, proved the myth wrong.

Here’s my list of the top 10 solar installer myths. It’s not complete but it covers the main myths.

#1

1) The ‘solargedden’ is coming because there are all these dodgy installations out there from fly-by-nighters

Now, I’ve heard of all these dodgy installs but haven’t really come across too many. I know that in my case I haven’t had anyone try to sell me a stupidly built solar system. My problem is the opposite: installers are foregoing revenue and profits because they won’t sell me a perfectly good solar system even though I’ve modelled it up using the same software they use and I understand exactly how the production will pan out and can relate that to the demand profile of the customer (which I also know).

Number 2 – ‘You can’t install panels facing East and West